Radiopopper Nano – Simple Solid Inexpensive Flash Trigger – Video Trailer

Radiopopper USA have released a video trailer outlining the features and functions of the coming Nano flash trigger.

The new Nano are being marketed as easiest, most reliable, and most affordable radio trigger.

That’s probably all a bit subjective, but from what we can see it looks like Radiopopper are onto something really quite good with the new Nano trigger. A little in the same vain as of the recent PocketWizard Plus X, Radiopopper have gone for super simple and reliable, just doing the very basics as well as they possibly can. In comparison many of the Chinese triggers try to pack a lot of features into a small price, often compromising the very basics of reliability and usability in some ways in the process. Its really quite refreshing to see something designed well for a purpose without obvious oversights.

Details so far

  • Simple manual triggers for speedlite and studio lights
  • Powerful, Reliable, and Inexpensive under $100 per unit.
  • Up to 500 meter range
  • 4 channels
  • Compatible with Radioppoer JrX and PX
  • Hotshoe for directly connecting a speedlight without any cord needed
  • Battery life indicator, on test fire 1 to 4 LED blinks showing battery condition
  • Auto power off after a certain period to save batteries
  • Touch sensitive buttons – so no mechanical parts to break
  • Standard 3.5mm sync port
  • Fire speedlight and studio strobes – trigger voltage likely 200 to 300 volts
  • Fire one flash via the hotshoe, and a second via the PC sync port
  • No mention of any shutter release function

Radiopopper Nano

The Nano are a super simple all manual transmitter and receiver, with very solid up to 500 metre range to rival the PocketWizard Plus series. Like the PocketWizard Plus series the Nano are also simple single firing pin triggers, so they are compatible with many camera models, which is becoming more important with many people using their Fuji and other brand mirrorless cameras alongside the traditional Canon/Nikon/Sony DSLR’s.

Unlike the PocketWizard Plus series the Nano are traditional separate transmitter and receiver units, which can be a slight disadvantage over the PocketWizard’s transceivers, as those are both exactly the same unit providing back up transmitters if needed. Though back ups should be much less of an issue with higher quality triggers like this anyway.

And a dedicated transmitter and receiver also have the advantage of allowing each one to be designed more nicely for the function required. The Nano transmitter being a nice compact and low profile unit when mounted on the camera. Its even clear just from the images the locking ring has easy access, for mounting and removing the transmitter to the camera quickly and easily. Something many triggers still constantly overlook.

Radiopopper Nano TX

Unlike the PocketWizard Plus series, the Nano actually have a hotshoe on the receiver, which makes them more speedlite friendly as there are no cords required to connect and fire a speedlite, and no trigger dangling around via the cord.

There is no foot on the receiver, which in my opinion is not a bad thing as it keeps the profile (and therefore flash mounted) lower, and forces you to use the threaded mounting hole in the base which eliminates the all too common broken feet, which is often the fate of many other receivers.

The receiver is quite long with the antenna, but at least it looks like Radiopopper have considered stacking them nicely side by side, and fairly compact, with the flat sides designed into the receiver case.

The sync port is standard 3.5 miniphone, which is the most preferable option.

Radiopopper Nano TX

Notable features are an auto power off function, which saves your batteries if you leave the triggers on accidentally for too long without use. I’m assuming Radioppoper would realize this needs to be a good few hours before shut off to not potentially cause an issue for some people.

And another very good feature is the battery level indicator, which is an extremely handy one, as it stops you unnecessarily going through extra alkaline batteries, or recharging Eneloops etc when not needed, shortening their life. Pressing the test fire button simply blinks the LED indicator from 1 to 4 times showing the current battery level each time its pressed.

Buttons are also touch sensitive with no mechanical parts so they are sealed from the elements and can’t physically break at some point.

There is no mention of a shutter release function, but with transmitter and receiver style triggers you need a complete separate set of triggers to do that anyway, and there are better dedicated shutter releases available specifically for that purpose.

 

So it appears Radioppoper are looking to have a solid little design with the Nano trigger, and surprisingly one there isn’t quite any current completely comparable alternative for. Just doing the basic things they do do really well is always going to be a sound base for something pretty solid. At first glance there may appear to be nothing particularly new here, but looking a little deeper the Nano looks to be quite a desirable option when it comes to simple inexpensive manual trigger alternatives.

If the video gets a bit drawn out, the basic point are as mentioned –

  • Simple manual triggers for speedlite and studio lights
  • Powerful, Reliable, and Inexpensive under $100 per unit.
  • Up to 500 meter range
  • 4 channels
  • Compatible with Radioppoer JrX and PX
  • Hotshoe for directly connecting a speedlight without any cord needed
  • Battery life indicator, on test fire 1 to 4 LED blinks showing battery condition
  • Auto power off after a certain period to save batteries
  • Touch sensitive buttons – so no mechanical parts to break
  • Standard 3.5mm sync port
  • Fire all speedlight and studio strobes – trigger voltage likely 200 to 300 volts
  • Fire one flash via the hotshoe, and a second via the PC sync port
  • No mention of any shutter release function

 

 

Radiopopper’s current manual trigger system, the JrX Studio, is also a very unique and clever one that sometimes gets overlooked. The JrX is one of the few triggers that will remotely control the manual power level of speedlites, through what is known as the quench pin technique. So this works with older inexpensive Nikon SB-24 to SB-28 and SB-80dx etc speedlites, all the way up to the SB-800. As well as all Canon ETTL flashes. But the JrX will also remotely control the power level of Alienbee and White Lightning monolights.

The Nano triggers should be compatible with the JrX, but without the remote power control.

Radiopopper JrX Studio and Radiopopper Cube connection for Canon and Nikon

Radiopopper Website

 

Related articles – Manual Flash Trigger Guide

6 Comments
  1. George GEORGIOU 5 years ago

    When will the nano come to Europe?

    • Author
      Flash Havoc 5 years ago

      Hi George,

      I’m sure they will eventually, best to check with Radiopopper directly for expected timing. Thanks

  2. George GEORGIOU 5 years ago

    Is the nano going to Europe?

  3. Harman 4 years ago

    i bought nano radio popper. it does not work with my youngness n568 ex flashlight. Can anyone help me. i am unable to find a way to make it work.

    • Author
      Flash Havoc 4 years ago

      Hi Harman,

      Do you mean the Nano simply wont fire the YN-568EX at all?

      Do you have any other flash units that are firing with the Nano?

  4. Brian 3 years ago

    Is there a special trick to get the Nano to work with a Sony HVL-F32M?

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